Partition, Helen Hooker O’Malley & Edith Somerville

This week we have the centenary of Partition along with the photographs of Helen Hooker O’Malley, a medieval manuscript associated with St Colum Cille and Edith Somerville’s birthday.

On Partition there was a lot to read and hear, including the Irish History show podcast with Cathal Brennan and John Dorney interviewing Cormac Moore; the Creative Centenaries website, based in Northern Ireland has lots of good content on this and many other subjects; the Irish Times interviewed a woman born in the year of partition while this was a good summary on the BBC website.

The National Library of Ireland has a wonderful online exhibition looking at the work of photographer Helen Hooker O’Malley. Born in the USA, she met Irish revolutionary and author Ernie O’Malley and they married in 1935 and moved to Ireland. Although they were divorced in 1952, she continued to love Ireland and photographed both urban and rural lives and landscapes.

Another online exhibition, this one from the Royal Irish Academy and telling the story of the manuscript known as the Cathach of Colum Cille, Dating from the 6th century, it contains a copy of the psalms written in Latin and is closely associated with Saint Colum Cille (c. 521-597), in this year which marks 1500 years since his birth. A Cathach was an object believed to have protective power in battle. One page, taken from the RIA website, is shown below.

C795C58C-2BAB-44A6-AE90-93687EECE2E9.jpeg

And finally yesterday, 2 May, was the birthday of one of West Cork’s most famous writers, Edith Somerville (1858-1949). She was born in Corfu, but spent most of her life at Drishane House in Castletownshend – the house is still lived in by the Somerville family and you can find out more about it on their website.  Read more about Edith herself on the Dictionary of Irish Biography website. The image below was drawn by Edith herself and is on the cover of her book Maria and Some Other Dogs. She wrote this book, as so many others, with her cousin Violet Martin.

This week we have the centenary of Partition along with the photographs of Helen Hooker O’Malley, a medieval manuscript associated with St Colum Cille and Edith Somerville’s birthday.
David Edwards: The Great Earl of Cork
Richard Boyle, first earl of Cork (1566-1643), ranks among the most famous and infamous figures in the history of early modern Ireland and the wider English Atlantic world. The archetypal crooked land-grabber who made his initial fortune defrauding the crown of hidden revenues; the grasping colonial adventurer who became the biggest landowner in the Munster Plantation and the richest subject of the crown throughout the Three Kingdoms.
Sylvie Kleinman: The Irish Republic 1796 – 2016
Dr Sylvie Kleinman on ‘Framing the Irish Republic 1796-2016: A revisit of Tone’s exile in France for the Decade of Commemorations’.
Gerald O’Brien on the Monster Repeal Meeting
Gerald O’Brien in conversation with William Casey on the subject of Daniel O’Connell and the Monster Repeal Meeting, Skibbereen, June 1843’.
Professor John Horne: 1919-1923
Professor John Horne: At the Crossroads: Ireland, Britain and the International Context, 1919-1923
Brendan Simms: Britain, Ireland and Europe
Brendan Simms – From Back door to Back Stop. Britain, Ireland and Europe in historical perspective
Ireland, Empire and the Sea
The great voyages of discovery (Columbus, de Gama, etc.) shifted the centre of gravity of European maritime trade from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic. Over the same period the conquest of Ireland was completed. By the eighteenth century, Ireland, for centuries on the periphery of Europe, found itself at the centre of this newly formed ‘Atlantic world’ as part of the British Empire. Listen to Tommy Graham, editor of History Ireland, discuss the maritime and colonial legacies with Aoife Bhreatnach (Irish Garrison Towns), Claire Connolly (UCC), Lar Joye (Dublin Port) and David Murphy (Maynooth). This podcast is supported by Dublin Port in association with the West Cork History Festival.
Intelligence in the War of Independence
One of the most important—and controversial—aspects of the War of Independence was the ‘intelligence war’. Given the role of spies and informers in defeating previous insurrections, it is not surprising that Michael Collins, the IRA’s Director of Intelligence, was keen to insure that history did not repeat itself. How successful was he? To shed light on this ‘shadow war’ listen to History Ireland editor, Tommy Graham, in discussion with Andy Bielenberg, Cécile Gordon, Eunan O’Halpin and Gerry White.
Professor Brian Walker: Cork & Ulster in 1920
Professor Brian Walker of Queen’s University Belfast talks about inter-connected violence in Cork and Ulster during the War of Independence. He touches on, among others, the connected murders of Tomás Mac Curtain and Oswald Swanzy.
Dr Eve Morrison: The Kilmichael Ambush
Dr Eve Morrison is Canon Murray Fellow in Irish History at St Catherine’s College Oxford. She is working on a major new book on the Kilmichael ambush due out in November for the centenary. Here, Eve discusses the interviews on which historian Peter Hart based his important if controversial work on the subject.
Kieran Doyle: Memorials of the revolution in Cork
West Cork historian Kieran Doyle discusses his project with Alan O’Rourke to map memorials of the revolutionary period across Cork
Ireland, Empire and the Sea
The great voyages of discovery (Columbus, de Gama, etc.) shifted the centre of gravity of European maritime trade from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic. Over the same period the conquest of Ireland was completed. By the eighteenth century, Ireland, for centuries on the periphery of Europe, found itself at the centre of this newly formed ‘Atlantic world’ as part of the British Empire. Listen to Tommy Graham, editor of History Ireland, discuss the maritime and colonial legacies with Aoife Bhreatnach (Irish Garrison Towns), Claire Connolly (UCC), Lar Joye (Dublin Port) and David Murphy (Maynooth). This podcast is supported by Dublin Port in association with the West Cork History Festival.
Brendan Simms: Britain, Ireland and Europe
Brendan Simms – From Back door to Back Stop. Britain, Ireland and Europe in historical perspective
thin